How The Future Of Interior Design Is Changing Today

The future is changing. Thanks in no small part to COVID-19, we are at the dawn of a new way of living. And with it, comes a new set of challenges. These days, with so much of our time spent cooped up within the same four walls every day, it’s becoming increasingly apparent how interior spaces can affect our mood, psyche, and productivity, amongst all else.

Now’s the time to relook the basics and plan for a future that is slowly coming into focus. Because even though the pandemic may end, people’s behaviour towards the spaces around them will no longer be the same. Here are some new perspectives to consider, courtesy of our onestop team.

1. MAKE A POSITIVE OUT OF YOUR NEGATIVE SPACES

Take the concept of social distancing into your designs and say hello to its cousin: Comfortable distancing. Now, more than ever, we can expect people to appreciate having their own bubble of personal space, especially with shared spaces in public. Whether designing for common areas such as commercial spaces, lounges, or even fitness centres, having the freedom to allow groups to separate from each other safely should be a key consideration. This means taking note of comfortable distancing between furniture and walkways during space planning. In a retail setting, it might even mean having to display your products further apart to accommodate for minimised contact between your customers—which could also accentuate your product’s features.

2. START ON A CLEAN SLATE

Nowadays, being comfortable is about more than just the physical aspect of it. For most people, it’s also about feeling safe and secure, especially with regards to the cleanliness and sanitisation of the spaces they are in. It’s crucial to pick the right materials for your furniture that will allow you to maintain and sanitise your spaces effectively. For more information on that, see our feature article here. Generally, less use of fabric is recommended as they tend to get dirty easily. On the contrary, use of hard materials like tiles and stones are easier to wipe down and clean. Some researchers such as Bill Keevil are even advocating a return to the mass use of copper, citing its antimicrobial properties as a safer material than plastic or steel.

3. KEEP UP WITH DEVELOPING TRENDS

Colours. Patterns. Textures. We frequently play with these in our design to bring a certain mood to our spaces, but within the current climate, it certainly matters to pay more attention to these details. Due to an increase in feelings of unrest, grief, and anxiety over the pandemic, certain trends can already be observed.

Firstly, there is an increase in demand for minimalist designs. Having unnecessary elements, extravagant themes, or excess of surfaces tend to be red flags for contact-wary customers. In terms of colour trends, customers are now craving palettes that instil a sense of reassurance and comfort in an age where mental and physical well-being are critical.

4. MERGE THE PHYSICAL WORLD WITH THE VIRTUAL

With a lack of physical spaces to interact with each other, it’s no wonder that video conferencing is slowly becoming an added staple to our everyday lives. Whether for work, games, or with our loved ones, this virtual channel of communication is not to be dismissed when considering future designs for your spaces. Accommodating a productive video conference might just be an important detail to look out for. And elements separate from the look of your spaces can come into play, such as good acoustics and lighting design—all adjustable with the right furniture.

ADAPTATION IS THE KEY TO CREATIVITY

A new normal. A new set of challenges. And endless possibilities. In your future designs, it’s important to consider how the new awareness of personal safety concerns have and will further affect how consumers behave in the spaces around them. As always, we’re here for you to walk this path together. Feel free to chat with us here and we look forward to assisting your designs with our expertise in furniture.

15 May 2020